« Subprime Implosion and Paid Search Advertising | Main | A Good Day For Mormons »

March 26, 2007

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451907b69e200d8352630c969e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Interpreter.com $19,000 on Sedo Auction:

Comments

Rob Sequin

Shhh. Don't let the seller hear that :-)

Seriously though? The name would have brought more on snapnames than on sedo?

Is it because of the time sensitive nature of the auctions?

Please enlighten us, maybe even with a full blog post?...especially since Snapnames has started their pro seller listings.

I was asked to participate and have sold several domains through them and have been happy with the results.

I don't think it's a secret anymore but few people know (or perhaps qualify) about selling their names through snapnames.

JP

I agree that there are names available at Sedo for lower prices than they would fetch at Snapnames. I wonder why that is?

Inspirational quote addict

Wow! 19K for a domain is a good price. Congrats on your latest dealing.

Drewbert


Why is it?

Have you tried to find a decent name to buy at Sedo? Their search feature sucks. Likewise a lot of their user interface. Same problem with most domain auction systems. Try sorting the wheat from the chaff on a regular basis and you'll end up in a padded cell.

Snap is easy because of downloadable lists and all the sucky names are only gumming up the system for 5 days max.

Take a look at just one category at AN - thousands of names, most of them crap. Again, you're limited by the user interface to look thorough the same names over and over again or limited to THEIR choice of auction listing age.

Basicity

My domains are listed only on Sedo. May be I should put some through Snapnames. Curious why domains on Snapnames fetch more than on Sedo. Does Snapnames attract certain type of domain buyers?

Edwin

Re. the Snapnames/Sedo pricing discrepancy, there are a number of reasons (plus some others I've no doubt forgotten) that combine to keep Snapnames prices "higher" than average.

A) Domainer "taint": Most Snapnames names are drops, whereas domainers tend to list their names on Sedo or Afternic. The mere fact that a name has been listed i.e. action has been taken to put it up for sale already says *something* about its quality (or lack thereof) in terms of traffic and revenue potential, etc. For example a name dropping at Snapnames *might* have a revenue stream potentially in the hundreds or thousands of dollars a day - a name listed on sale at Afternic almost certainly won't, because those kinds of names don't tend to get touted around in that way.

B) Momentary availability combined with prime audience: Snapnames only makes names available during a short timeframe, the same for all potential bidders. In a sense, each Snapnames drop is actually a silent auction lasting 5 days, with potentially the cream of the world's top domainers in the virtual auction room. Sedo, on the other hand, can't generate the same sense of urgency. While their auctions certainly have a time limit, the number of quality names passing through the auction process there probably doesn't warrant more than a cursory glance from the top Snap players, given the better things they could be doing with their time and money.

Edwin Hayward

Re. the Snapnames/Sedo pricing discrepancy, there are a number of reasons (plus some others I've no doubt forgotten) that combine to keep Snapnames prices "higher" than average.

A) Domainer "taint": Most Snapnames names are drops, whereas domainers tend to list their names on Sedo or Afternic. The mere fact that a name has been listed i.e. action has been taken to put it up for sale already says *something* about its quality (or lack thereof) in terms of traffic and revenue potential, etc. For example a name dropping at Snapnames *might* have a revenue stream potentially in the hundreds or thousands of dollars a day - a name listed on sale at Afternic almost certainly won't, because those kinds of names don't tend to get touted around in that way.

B) Momentary availability combined with prime audience: Snapnames only makes names available during a short timeframe, the same for all potential bidders. In a sense, each Snapnames drop is actually a silent auction lasting 5 days, with potentially the cream of the world's top domainers in the virtual auction room. Sedo, on the other hand, can't generate the same sense of urgency. While their auctions certainly have a time limit, the number of quality names passing through the auction process there probably doesn't warrant more than a cursory glance from the top Snap players, given the better things they could be doing with their time and money.

DomainerPro

I received an invitation to sell my domains through Snapnames' pro seller program, but here's the problem: I BOUGHT a lot of my domains at Snapnames. So it doesn't seem likely that I'll get a higher price than I paid, since I was the winning bidder last time. Though on some of them it's been a couple of years, so perhaps I'll make money just due to price inflation. I'll try it.

Steven

Nice Buy!

Seems very reasonable in today's market

The comments to this entry are closed.