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June 12, 2007

Comments

anonymous

I think you are significantly overestimating the value of the .Name registry.

***FS*** If so, that's very sad.. so much effort and acrimony to create a namespace with so litle enterprise value.

Franky Tong

FYI, the same Chinese surnames could be spelled differently based on different regions and different spoken dialects. For example, "Zhang" is the common spelling in mainland China but it's spelled "Chang" in Taiwan and "Cheung" in Hong Kong.

Dave Wrixon

Well frank if you are interested in Chinese Surnames in dot com, I can probably drag up a few top 100 surnames. I filled in the gaps, so I guess you won't find any free to register. Don't know for sure about dot CN. There is an online list for the top 200 in Chinese somewhere.

Dave Wrixon

Just a bit of clarification here. The full pinyin for Surnames is more like Zhang2 or Zhang4. The numbers after are essential for pronunciation. I doubt whether Chinese will really identify strongly with anything other than the actual Chinese characters. Nearly all Chinese surnames are single character. These are very special.

GoldenBear

Zhang/Cheung could also be Jang, Jeung, or a number of other latin spellings to overseas Chinese, but it's spelled only two ways in Chinese.

Zhang would be 张 in China (Simplified Chinese)

Cheung/Jeung/Chang would be 張 in Hong Kong, Taiwan (Traditional Chinese)

Dave Wrixon

Update:

Chinese officials are considering measures to expand the number of surnames in the country in order to prevent confusion, state media says.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6745259.stm

I guess that is not good news for me!

Ha

any IDN category you DON'T have dave? Nobody asked you to brag your portfolio listing ;-).

Steve Morsa

...than again...almost ANYTHING'S more valuable than the entire .name registry... :-)

touchring

Chinese top surnames are so common, it like a complement to the name itself. The reason why in Taiwan and China, people like to call by full name (surname+name).

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